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Italian Greyhound Club of America Rescue

Sponsored by the Italian Greyhound Rescue Foundation

February is Senior Adoption Month

During February only, any IG 9 years of age or over nationally will quality for $50 off the adoption donation. Submit your application today!

General Adoption Requirements

We take many factors in to consideration when considering to approve a home for an Italian Greyhound, however some of the most important factors are outlined here.

Apartments or Rented Houses

If you live in an apartment, or rent a home we do verify that pets are allowed by the property owners, or if an Italian Greyhound will confirm to what is allowed by the rental agreement.

Fencing

Keeping your IG confined while outdoors is an absolute must, and here are general recommendations for helping keep them safe:

Type - Chain-link or privacy fence are very common and are generally adequate for most Italian Greyhounds. The fence should be permanently installed in to the ground, or securely fasted in a manner where it can not be manipulated by a squirmy Italian Greyhound. The fencing should have no gaps or holes wider than 2 inches in corners, where it meets a house, underneath, at seams or other places which would allow an IG to wriggle through.

Height - Generally 4 foot tall fencing is needed at a minimum to contain an Italian Greyhound. However, some dogs who can jump especially high may require a taller fence.

Electric/Underground Fencing - These types of fencing are not acceptable to contain an Italian Greyhound, and should not be used as a primary type of fence if other options are allowed. Many cities or counties do not consider electric or underground fences as a legal enclosure either, so potential adopters considering fencing options should also consult local ordinances when deciding on a fence.

Rural Areas - In rural areas we also feel that a fence is needed for any Italian Greyhound. Not only does a fence keep a dog in a yard, but it also helps to keep other wildlife out and away from the dog. Predators including coyotes, wolves, alligators or crocodiles are only a few of the animals that may try to grab a dog running loose.

Tie-Outs - Also referred to as tie-downs, these are not adequate to contain an Italian Greyhound who has the desire to chase something, or to escape and do some exploring. Tie-downs also present a choking hazard, and do not keep other domestic or wild animals away from the dog. Additionally, it has been shown that dogs who are tied out tend to develop aggression issues compared to those who are not.

City or County Limitations

Many cities or counties have restrictions on the number of pets any household can own. Our rescue representatives are familiar with most of these local laws, and may need to verify if a home abides to these restrictions. In some areas special permits are available which allow additional pets, and any potential adopter must provide documentation to show such a permit has been approved if required in a jurisdiction where the IG will live.

Current Pet Vaccinations & Heartworm Prevention

Households who already own pets need to demonstrate that they properly care for their existing dogs, cats or other animals and routinely provide them veterinary care. This includes at a minimum:

Many vets recommend other services which may not be necessary, but the above items are a good indication of how a home would care for an adopted pet, based on the history of caring for current pets. We take veterinary references very serious, and check these references thoroughly. You may be asked to provide further information or contact information for other veterinary service providers to verify the above have been provided to existing pets.

Frequently Asked Questions About Adopting

We get a lot of questions related to the process and some of the most are outlined on our FAQ page.

 
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